12 Steps to Bias-Free Selection

“You remind me of a myself 20 years ago, you’re hired!’

“I’ve got a good feeling about this guy. Let’s bring him on board”

“I don’t like his ‘limp fish’ handshake; let’s go with another candidate”

Sound familiar? If it does, then your company is likely utilizing selection processes that leverage gut feelings and other biases. You may be in for a shock in the months and years ahead. The employment landscape is changing and with that comes a shift to the employees having the power to select among multiple employers for the position they are driving towards. This means now is the time to revisit your selection practices to ensure they allow you to effectively identify top talent, versus letting it walk out your door.

12 Steps to Bias-Free Selection

1. Determine desirable qualifications for role.
2. Solidify required qualifications for role and equivalencies. Once set these should not be changed during the process.
3. Develop a plan to assess skills, knowledge and abilities, and any additional requirements (security?)
4. Determine what behavioural traits (competencies) are required for the role/organization.
5. Develop behavioural based interview questions and scoring grid to assess these traits (competencies).
6. Solidify an overall scoring grid. Once set this should not be changed during the process.
7. Train and educate on selection process to be used and need for consistency.
8. Devise and execute a strategy to post job to a wide source of applicants (internal, employee referrals, employment agencies, job boards, LinkedIn, Twitter)
9. Review resumes against required qualifications for role. Set aside all resumes who do not meet the minimum criteria.
10. Screen remaining candidates for skills, knowledge, abilities and requirements as outlined in plan.
11. Conduct behavioural based interviews. (Situation, Task, Action, Result).
12. Select best candidate using overall scoring grid (requirements, knowledge, skills, abilities, competencies/soft skills).
13. Optional: Have an uninvolved person review scores and evaluation notes and select best candidate. Is it the same individual?

Labour and Union Relations

It takes two; two to make and two to break. We’ve heard this applied time and time again to our personal lives although it could not be truer for the Management and Union relationship.

The ability for labour relations to be successful heavily depends on both parties having a strong relationship to rely on when things get dicey.

With a strong foundation, both parties can express their interest in an environment that allows for disagreement while still maintaining a mutual respect. Now if we could only apply that to our personal lives…..hmm.